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September 21, 2017

Economic self-determination through lending: empowering Indigenous Peoples, implementing UNDRIP

Shannin Metatawabin
Indigenous issues
The Hill Times - September 18, 2017

In the 1980s, the federal government and Indigenous leaders were on the right track. Prior to the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and even prior to the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples, it was known that the Indigenous economy needed attention. This resulted in the creation of a network of Indigenous business development financial institutions. With an initial federal investment of $240-million, these institutions have since provided more than 42,000 loans totalling $2.3-billion to Indigenous communities and entrepreneurs.

The businesses these loans made possible are diverse. One factor unites them: all are led by Indigenous individuals or communities taking their economic futures into their own hands. In very concrete, everyday ways, these businesses help realize the right to economic self-determination guaranteed in the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP).

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August 8, 2017

CBC Radio Interview with NACCA CEO

Photo - Shannin Metatawabin - CEO - NACCA

Shannin Metatawabin - NACCA CEO

During NACCA's Annual General Meeting this past June, CEO Shannin Metatawabin was interviewed on CBC Radio in Edmonton.

This seven-minute interview gives a brief review of NACCA and the AFI network across Canada.  He focuses on the importance, and positive economic impacts, of the AFI network, as well as a couple of the numerous entrepreneur success stories.

Link to interview on CBC website:
http://www.cbc.ca/player/play/973724739690

 

July 21, 2017

Ulnooweg First Aboriginal Business To Be Given Torch Award for Ethics

Halifax, NS/June 22, 2017 – BBB Serving the Atlantic Provinces was honoured to present a Torch Award for Business Ethics to the first ever Aboriginal business recipient last week. On Friday, June 23, Truro’s Ulnooweg Development Group received a Torch Award for the 11 to 49 employee category. Torch Awards are given to companies who go above and beyond to give back to their communities and inspire marketplace trust.

“It falls into our work to build awareness about the Aboriginal business population, our need to connect with the non-Aboriginal community, and vice-versa,” says Chris Googoo, general manager of Ulnooweg. “Reconciliation goes both ways. It is important that when we take one step forward, they take two steps towards us. We can help close the gap between us through awareness of the issues in Indigenous communities, such as access to capital.”

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June 20, 2017

“Reconcile-Action” – A Call to Action for National Aboriginal History Month

By Shannin Metatawabin

Did you know that June is National Aboriginal History Month? In 2009, the House of Commons passed a unanimous motion to celebrate the contributions and cultures of First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples. The month was also intended to provide an opportunity to reflect on their strengths and aspirations.

Recalling the purpose of National Aboriginal History Month, the situation calls for “reconcile-action,” a term coined by our elder, Dr. Wilton Littlechild. In a recent report advising the federal government, the National Aboriginal Economic Development Board estimated that Canada could gain $27.7 billion towards the GDP by acting to close the gap between mainstream Canada and indigenous peoples – in quality of life, infrastructure, education, health and economic development opportunities. Continue reading

May 25, 2017

Changes Ahead in 2017

For the last several years, the Canadian Chamber of Commerce has published an annual list of the Top 10 Barriers to Canadian Competitiveness. That document listed some of the self-inflicted wounds that have prevented Canada's economy from achieving its full potential and set out their recommendations for change.

This year, they released a different document. Instead of focusing on barriers, they outlined 10 ways to improve our economic success, along with specific recommendations to advocate throughout the year.

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March 29, 2017

NACCA Announces Gerry Huebner as Chief Strategy Officer

Ottawa, March 23, 2017 - The National Aboriginal Capital Corporations Association (NACCA) is pleased to announce the appointment of Gerry Huebner as Chief Strategy Officer. Gerry graduated from Trent University in 1983 with a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Administration and went on to earn his Master’s Degree in Public Administration from Queens University in 1986.
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March 23, 2017

Purdy Crawford Chair – Developmental Financing for Aboriginal Businesses

The Purdy Crawford Chair in Aboriginal Business Studies

Case Studies in Aboriginal Business

Developmental Financing for Aboriginal Businesses
Marcia Nickerson

SYNOPSIS

Court decisions over resource and revenue sharing continue to benefit Aboriginal communities across Canada and, as opportunities emerge, Aboriginal businesses are growing much more quickly than in mainstream Canada. Consequently there is an increasing demand for access to capital and innovative financing to enable the start-up and growth of such businesses. Most Aboriginal businesses are small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and are often the primary engines of economic growth for many Aboriginal communities. They represent a significant opportunity to address many of the existing socio-economic challenges by reducing unemployment and creating wealth. Continue reading

March 7, 2017

Report Shows Aboriginal Entrepreneurs Face Significant Barriers in Financial Ecosystem

Ottawa, March 7, 2017 - The National Aboriginal Capital Corporations Association (NACCA) and the Business Development Bank of Canada (BDC) commissioned a study of the financial ecosystem that provides support for Aboriginal entrepreneurship in Canada. NACCA and its member Aboriginal Financial Institutions (AFIs) provide financing and support to Aboriginal entrepreneurs. The number of AFIs across Canada has grown to over 50 and include Aboriginal Capital Corporations, Aboriginal Developmental Lenders and Aboriginal Community Futures Development Corporations. In addition to BDC’s mainstream financial services and advice, BDC’s Aboriginal Banking Unit offers two specialized streams of financing for Aboriginal entrepreneurs including the “Aboriginal Business Development Fund,” and “Growth Capital for Aboriginal Business.” Continue reading

February 15, 2017

Expanding the Circle: What Reconciliation and Inclusive Economic Growth Can Mean for First Nations and Canada

Economic reconciliation is not only the fair and right thing to do, but there’s a strong business case for it as well. Canada’s economy would grow by $27.7 billion annually if barriers preventing Indigenous Canadians from participating in the Canadian economy were removed, according to a recent report by the National Aboriginal Economic Development Board.

The Public Policy Forum, held February 15, 2017 at the Westin in Ottawa, partnered with the National Aboriginal Economic Development Board, the National Aboriginal Capital Corporations Association and Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada to deliver the first in a three-part series of conferences on reconciliation and inclusive economic growth. Continue reading

January 6, 2017

NACCA Director P&S Appointment

NACCA Announces Mark Dokis as Director of Products and Services

Ottawa, January 6, 2017 - The National Aboriginal Capital Corporations Association (NACCA) is pleased to announce Mark Dokis as the director of products and services. Mark is a member of the Dokis First Nation in Northeastern Ontario. He graduated with honours from Laurentian University in 1984 with a Bachelor of Arts in geography. He went on to earn certificates in economic development and business administration and management.

“I’m looking forward to helping Aboriginal entrepreneurs achieve their full potential,” said Mark. “We will foster growth in the Aboriginal economy by providing programs and tools entrepreneurs can use to strengthen their communities.”

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